Pumpkin Trivia to Entertain Your Thanksgiving Guests

You’re a  pumpkin superstar. Or  you will be after reading these pumpkin facts. Pull ’em out while everyone’s enjoying that excellent pie you made.

Pumpkin Trivia to Entertain Your Thanksgiving Guests

You made the pie. You might as well brag about it. When everyone is raving about your pie, quiz them with some pumpkin trivia (the University of Illinois Extension seems to be the expert on all things pumpkin).

1. How many pounds of pumpkins are grown every year in the U.S.?

About 1.1 billion

2. What four states produce the most pumpkins?

Illinois, Ohio, Pennsylvania and California

3. What is the largest pumpkin ever grown in America?

2,145 pounds. The record was set this year by a grower in Illinois.

4. Where did pumpkins originate?

Central America

5. How big was the world’s largest pumpkin pie?

Guinness World Records reports that the pie weighed 3,699 pounds and the crust used 440 sheets of dough. A pumpkin grower association from Ohio made this gigantic pie in 2010.

6. What did colonial bakers use for their crusts back in their day?

Pumpkin (of course)

7. What two (very different) ailments did people swear that pumpkin helped throughout the years?

Freckles and snake bites (yes, really), according to the University of Illinois Extension.

8. Where does the word “pumpkin” come from?

Thank the Greeks. Everyone’s favorite fall dessert comes from the word pepon, meaning “a gigantic melon”.

9. How did the Colonists make their pie? (You would never ever guess this).

According to The Illinois Extension, they cut the pumpkin tops off, took the seeds out and then poured milk, spices and honey  INTO the pumpkin. They baked it using hot ashes.

10. Other than the flesh, what other part of the pumpkin can you eat?

The seeds, you probably knew about. But did you know you can also eat pumpkin flowers? They’re amazing stuffed with seasoned ricotta and then fried. Don’t get me started. Pumpkin flowers are so good they could be a whole Cookful topic on their own.

This post originally appeared in November, 2015 and was revised and republished in November, 2016.

Amy Bowen

Amy had no clue how to cook until she became the food reporter for a daily newspaper in Minnesota. At 25, she even struggled with boxed mac and cheese. These days, Amy is a much better cook, thanks to interviewing cooks and chefs for more than 10 years. She even makes four cheese macaroni and cheese with bacon, no boxed mac in sight. Amy is also on the editorial team at The Cookful.