Two Ways To Cut a Pepper for Stuffing

Did you know that there are two different ways to cut a pepper before stuffing it? And how you do it may tell you something about yourself.

There are two kinds of people. Traditionalists and…umm…untraditionalists. I’m betting we can figure out which kind you are by how you prep your bell peppers for stuffing.

Do you keep them whole, with just the top and stem removed? You traditionalist, you.

Do you halve the peppers and leave the stem on for a cool presentation? Oh, aren’t you modern.

Whichever you prefer, we want to urge you to shake yourself free and give the other a try. You never know, you might learn something new about yourself. To help with this self-exploration, we’re giving you the how-to guide for both prepping methods. Read on to find out how to cut peppers to stuff them the traditional way and an untraditional way.

Traditional: Whole Peppers

The most traditional way to prep a pepper (like the kind your mom used to make) is to keep the pepper mostly whole. All you’re going to do is cut off the top, really.

Step#1

Lay the pepper on its side. In a fluid motion, cut the top stem section of the pepper off. Add whooshing sound effects for added entertainment.

Cutting the top off a bell pepper

Step#2

Use a paring knife to remove the remaining pith and seeds.

Deseeding A Bell Pepper

Step#3

Go in with the paring knife to dislodge any excess pith or seeds. You can turn the pepper over to shake some of the loose seeds out.  This Classic Stuffed Peppers recipe uses whole peppers like these.

Cored Bell Pepper

The Modern Way: Halved Stuffed Peppers

The traditional whole peppers have a large cavity to fill, which means that it takes a long time for the filling to heat through. These days, few of us have time for that. Thus, the modern pepper cut! These Buffalo Chicken Stuffed Peppers use halved peppers. The amazing thing about them is that you don’t even have to pre-cook the filling. The cavity of the pepper is shallow enough that you can put in raw chicken and it will cook through in time.

Step#1

Sit your pepper on the cutting board stem side up. Cut the pepper in half vertically right through the middle of the stem and the bottom of the pepper.

Cutting a Bell Pepper in half for stuffing

At this point you can either choose to keep the stems intact, or remove them from the peppers. By leaving the stems intact, it creates a small bowl which is easily filled to the top. And, the stem makes a nice presentation. If you instead decide to cut off the stem, you benefit by being able to eat the entire pepper.

Step#2

Use a pairing knife to cut away all of the pith and seeds.

Cutting pith out of pepper

There you have it. Have you decided to try something new? Doesn’t matter. I think we can all agree that a stuffed pepper is good, no matter how you cut it 😉

How To Cut Peppers for Stuffing

Yield: 1 serving

Prep Time: 2 minutes

Total Time: 2 minutes

Ingredients:

bell peppers

Directions:

Traditional Whole Peppers: The most traditional way to prep a pepper (like the kind your mom used to make) is to keep the pepper mostly whole. All you're going to do is cut off the top, really.
  1. Lay the pepper on its side. In a fluid motion, cut the top stem section of the pepper off. Add whooshing sound effects for added entertainment.
  2. Use a paring knife to remove the remaining pith and seeds.
  3. Go in with the paring knife to dislodge any excess pith or seeds. You can turn the pepper over to shake some of the loose seeds out.  This Classic Stuffed Peppers recipe uses whole peppers like these.
Halved Stuffed Peppers: The traditional whole peppers have a large cavity to fill, which means that it takes a long time for the filling to heat through. These days, few of us have time for that. Thus, the modern pepper cut! These Buffalo Chicken Stuffed Peppers use halved peppers. The amazing thing about them is that you don't even have to pre-cook the filling. The cavity of the pepper is shallow enough that you can put in raw chicken and it will cook through in time. Sit your pepper on the cutting board stem side up. Cut the pepper in half vertically right through the middle of the stem and the bottom of the pepper.
  1. At this point you can either choose to keep the stems intact, or remove them from the peppers. By leaving the stems intact, it creates a small bowl which is easily filled to the top. And, the stem makes a nice presentation. If you instead decide to cut off the stem, you benefit by being able to eat the entire pepper.
  2. Use a pairing knife to cut away all of the pith and seeds.

 

Christine Pittman

Christine is the Founder and Senior Editor of The Cookful. She also blogs at COOKtheSTORY where she specializes in easy healthy homemade recipes. Healthiness aside, she has been known to shred cheese onto a dinner plate, microwave it for 30 seconds, and then eat the messy goop with a spoon.